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I hunt ducks & geese near Petersburg & Michigan area's and I've noticed more posted signs every year reading..."Posted because of Sod Busters"! "If you don't like it, contact your state represenative!" Something like that...Does anyone know what this is all about? It's cost me a few nice slough's the last few years...thanks :sniper:
 

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This may change some of their minds - But I bet you still won't be able to hunt :roll:

I hope they don't give an inch - but many will take a mile ???

Administration changes wetlands policy
Isolated swamps, bogs may not be protected
By Michael Kilian and Julie Deardorff
Chicago Tribune

WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency took action Friday to curb the authority of its field agents to enforce rules protecting the nation's wetlands, and it began a process that could cut wetlands protection even further.

Environmentalists quickly denounced the actions as an attack on the Clean Water Act, and they insisted the EPA's moves had the potential to harm as much as 60 percent of the nation's wetlands.

"This is just one salvo in the Bush administration's all-out assault on fundamental protections for our air, water and public health," said Gregory Wetstone, advocacy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council. "The Bush administration has intensified its effort to undermine our landmark environmental laws."

EPA Administrator Christie Whitman insisted that the administration remains committed to a policy of "no net loss" of wetlands in the United States and said the new measures would not change that.

"We are committed to protecting America's wetlands and watersheds to the full extent under the Clean Water Act," she said.

The areas involved - known as "isolated wetlands," because they generally are not connected to other waterways - amount to no more than 20 percent of the nation's total waterways and may be only half that, an EPA spokesman said, dismissing the environmentalists' claims to the contrary.

Limits enforcement

By the agency's own admission, however, the ability of EPA field agents to enforce provisions of the clean water law will be curtailed under the new rules, leaving state, tribal and local governments to decide the fate of many isolated wetlands.

The Clean Water Act applies mostly to navigable and interconnected waterways capable of spreading pollution over large areas. Its applicability to isolated wetlands - ponds, swamps, bogs, seasonal streams and the like - is more limited and has been called into question.

According to Ben Grumbles, deputy associate administrator of the EPA's Office of Water, the migratory wildfowl concern has long been the agency's primary justification for exercising jurisdiction in these isolated water bodies.

In its 2001 ruling, the Supreme Court said the EPA was overstepping its authority and decreed that the agency could no longer enforce the Clean Water Act in isolated wetland cases solely on the basis of threats to migratory fowl.

In one of Friday's major actions, the EPA prohibited its field agents from using the Clean Water Act to regulate these wetlands, if migratory bird concerns were their only reason for doing so. This "guidance" also required local offices to get permission from EPA headquarters in Washington before enforcing the pollution control law on isolated wetlands for any other reason.

In a second action, the EPA launched a process likely to lead to a new federal rule redefining "isolated wetlands" and setting new limits on federal jurisdiction over them.
 

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Let see.

You can not hunt my land if I can not drain and farm my wetlands acres.

But, if I drain tile my land and remove the wetlands and then farm it from ditch to ditch

- you are welcome to hunt what little widlife is left to exist on my land. :eyeroll:
 
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