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If thats the one with the Hogue stock, then it should be okay, but if it dosen't then I think it will be like any other 7 mag.
 

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What "felt recoil" is like in a particular gun is very subjective. As noted, if you've shot other 7mms, then you'll have a sense.
"Free recoil" can be calculated. 7mm Mag - for a 7lb. gun firing a 160 grain bullet at 3000 fps. over 70 grains of powder, the free recoil is 26 ft.lbs. For a six lb. gun, the recoil is 30 ft.lbs.
For comparison, a 30-06 in a 7 lb. rifle, 180 gr. bullet at 2750 fps, 50 grains of powder, will have 22 ft.lbs of free recoil.
But how those feel to you is another matter.
Pete
 

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If you have to ask it's probably more than you'll want or be able to deal with.That said Magna porting or similar process can reduce the felt recoil considerably so if you really think the 7 mag is something you want or need there are ways to make it happen.I've no idea what the cost is.
 

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Darkgael is on the money. I find the recoil of any Ruger M77 much more noticable in the same calibers, than the Remington 700's I prefer & use. Something about their straight stock design that just doesn't work with my high cheekbones...

I've always found it ironic that many guys who shoot god-alone-knows how many rounds of 12 gauge a year, find rifles in the 7MM and up class tough to shoot.

Shooting rifle that generate recoil (and I don't consider the 7MM Mag to be much of a hard hitter) is simply a matter training. You have to put the rounds through the rifle to master it. A person learns to shoot big stuff the same way you would learn to drive a high performance car. Recoil is the price of performance when it comes to firearms.

I shoot a lot of rifle rounds year round, and personally don't find the recoil of 7MM Mag, 300 Mag, 338 Mag, and heavy 45-70 loads to be horrendous. Recoil is just part of shooting stuff like this...
 

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NDTerminator said:
Darkgael is on the money. I find the recoil of any Ruger M77 much more noticable in the same calibers, than the Remington 700's I prefer & use. Something about their straight stock design that just doesn't work with my high cheekbones...

I've always found it ironic that many guys who shoot god-alone-knows how many rounds of 12 gauge a year, find rifles in the 7MM and up class tough to shoot.

Shooting rifle that generate recoil (and I don't consider the 7MM Mag to be much of a hard hitter) is simply a matter training. You have to put the rounds through the rifle to master it. A person learns to shoot big stuff the same way you would learn to drive a high performance car. Recoil is the price of performance when it comes to firearms.

I shoot a lot of rifle rounds year round, and personally don't find the recoil of 7MM Mag, 300 Mag, 338 Mag, and heavy 45-70 loads to be horrendous. Recoil is just part of shooting stuff like this...
It's kind of funny. I used to find my 300WM had a lot of recoil, but I got used to it. Then I thought the 45-70 had a lot of recoil and finally got used to that. I believe you are right. You just have to learn to handle it.

A friend of mine was shooting his 270 and started pulling shots after about 20 rounds. I started shooting it and after the loud noise of the report on the first shot, I looked around to see who was shooting because I wasn't even sure if the gun had gone off. You either get used to it, or develope a flinch. I do believe the 45-70 would be a very bad choice for someone to start with.
 

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Iwanta: I immediately thought about you and the 45-70 when this thread started.
One of the unexpected benefits of shooting - of learning to shoot - heavy recoiling firearms is that anything lesser is no big deal. Once, I thought that a 30-06 was a fair amount of recoil; then I got a T/C Contender in 45-70 and recoil was a whole new game. I got used to that. Went to a .300 Mag; it was no big deal. Finally, some years ago now, I ended up with .416 Rigby in a Ruger #1. That got my attention for a while - still does if I don't hold it right - but all the other guns were.... no big deal. After the Rigby, I bought a .375 H&H (just to have one); it was not a problem after the larger cartridge.
Just recently, I started shooting some serious loads in a 45-70 Handi-Rifle. I was prepared to be a bit dazed because the gun is so light. Well, those three words again, NBD.

Pete
 
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