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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,
This is my first post here and it's a long one. It all started two weeks ago, we had a english mastiff that was great at keeping the coyotes away, but he messed up big time, attacked one of my horses and tried to bite the barn cat in half, so he is nolonger with us. Since his removal, the coyotes have returned with a vengance. The last two nights at 10:30pm they have started yipping and howling. The first night they stayed about 150 ft from my home, but last night I was surrounded, literally. They were in my front yard, the side yard and backyard and in the pasture. The ones in the back I could see running thru the outside edge of the sercurity light, they were everywhere! I walk every morning and today I took our other dog with me and my .22, but was uneasy the whole time. My other dog is a wimp, but I figured if I got into any touble I would turn him loose and find the nearest tree and let him distract and deal with the trouble. I know that sounds bad, but hey everyone for themselves. I guess my question is what should/would I do about this situation. I am interested in snares, because I have found the runs where they are crossing onto my property. I also am thinking that some of these animals are coydogs, and would I also be able to take them with snares? Last winter I watched a huge male and a "normal" female catching mice in the cornfield across the road. the male was atleast 6inches taller and alot longer than the female and had the most gorgous almost solid black coat. I wasn't in a postion to be able to try and shoot them there were houses directlly behind them the whole time they hunted. Sorry about the length of this post but I need some ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, but with that many coyotes out there, I don't have the guts to go out in the dark. I wasn't really confortable taking a walk in broad daylight. I know I saw atleast 6 individuals under the lights and more were calling from the front yard and more in the side yard. I was interested in a way to get rid of them without being out there with them in the dark. But thanks for the sugestion.
 

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I am a coyote hunter myself and I know how eerie it can be to be out in the middle of the night with them around you. If you don't really want to sit out with a 12 gauge at night, then trapping might be a good method to go with. My dad, brother, and I trap down in central/southern mn and we have been able to trap a couple coyotes. I would say that would be the best bet if you don't want to sit out and wait for them. Otherwise you could find some hunters that would be willing to come out and take care of them for you. I would love to go out there! :lol: That might get the job done faster.
 

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Welcome to Nodak Outdoors!

I would shoot them with the .22 right from the house if they are that close. Just make sure you can use a firearm at night in your state. I would contact the local Sheriff's office and tell them that you are going to protect yourself and your property from coyotes. If they say you can't then insist they do it.

Although many of us here wish we had your problem I am sorry for your losses, now make them pay.

If anyone says anything about wounding them do not repeat do not take it to heart they are not in your shoes. Stay safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for your welcome. Unfortunetly I live right next door to a sheriff and shooting isn't allowed after dark. I had a run in with a ticked off **** one night, it was deterimed to enter our horse barn and since EPM is spread by **** an possom feces I was just as determined not to allow it in, let me tell you wacking it with a scoop shovel will really get interesting... it hissed and lunged and I beat a retreat out the door and got a gun and had just shot it when the neighbor was driving by.. of course he turned around and proceeded to lecture me on the legality of shooting after dark. I explained the EPM issues and told him that it was acting "weird" so it might have been sick. So he let it go at that but warned me. After my second post I visited with a neighbor and her outside dog(beagle mix) came home with injuries so we are assuming that the coyotes are responsible. I would love some information on setting snares, would anyone have any websites where I can get that info? I also called and conplained today to the DNR and the Animal Control but in a nut shell, they are saying "too bad about your luck" One funny thing happened, i had found a "coyote call" online and downloaded it and played it . our indoor cat who was napping in a recliner, woke up went airborne, skidded down our hall and has been in my bed since then, so I am assuming that they have harrased her. I hope the coyotes stay away tonight, I would love to be able to get some sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh and thank you for the advice on not taking it to heart on killing/wounding them. Anyone who knows me, knows how I take care of our animals/livestock and I feel that if you are going to have them its your responsiblity to take care of them in the manner that it best for them. And for me that includes killing any dogs/coyotes that are a threat to my animals. I have had one foal killed over the years and haven't forgotten how terrible it was, at the time we weren't sure if it was dogs or coyotes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Northwoods Girl,
I wish someone else had my problem. LOL I unfortunatlly have alot of neighbors and the majority of them would have a high speed fall apart if I had hunters in to hunt. They have become accustomed to me and some of the "*******" things I do, so they would definatlley do a "double take" to see me out with a gun, but then they wouldn't think too much about it.
 

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what time of day does your no shoot after dark law start. Try and find where they bed down all day and whack em there before it gets dark. What about some type of poison, what the cats and dogs though.

I can't believe that the DNR or animal control won't help. Shoot them with a bow, nobody will hear that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We live by a state recreation area and the DNR is more concerned with giving the colledge students tickets for underage drinking and the boaters without proper permits tickets. I don't want to go the poison route, I have lost a couple cats to our neighbors use of it. I got a chuckle out of the "use a bow" the last time I shot a bow I let my forearm bow in, and when i released, it hit my arm and I let out a scream and tossed the bow straight up in the air. I had a welt raise up immedatelly that covered the whole underside of my arm.My boyfriend at the time didn't know who/what to check on first... me or his precious bow. I have to admit, he checked the bow first.. I hope him and it are still happy together. I have a good idea where they are denning/bedding down.. but it's probabley on state land. I'm going to have to get them when they are "tresspassing" on my property. I think I have figured out one reason why they are suddenlly overrunning me, a flock of Canadian geese are bedding down in the field across the road from us and I guess the coyotes are looking for a goose dinner.
 

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try getting a great pyrenese they are great at keeping coyotes away and will not harm any livestock if your property is fenced
Best answer so far!
 

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I would second the suggestion of shooting them with a bow. Learn how to do it without hurting yourself, and then let them have it! Snares will kill indiscriminately, and you may get a neighbors dog. A trap would be more likely to keep them alive until you get to them, so if you trap someone's pet, you are less likely to kill it.

Either a bow or getting a new vicious dog would be my choice.
 

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First off, I wouldnt be uneasy around coyotes. Dont be afraid of them, its not like their lions and tigers and bears. Their much more interested in your little dog than you.

Second, if your in that populated of an area to where your afraid to shoot one, id make a call to your states game and fish, DNR or what have you and get a state ADC person out to take care of the problem. This person will have the authority to make shots or trap in populated areas without repurcussions. Id stay away from snares, like was stated, they kill indiscriminantly and you dont want to be killing neighbors dogs and cats by mistake.
But removing them brings the problem of coyotes. By removing them, your just opening up their territory for new coyotes, thus starting a most likely never ending battle.
To take matters into your own hands, you could try a bow, but this could take you months to become proficient at if youve never shot one before. You could try one of the uber high power pellet guns (if their in your yard your not going to be shooting very far) equipped with a scope. Get proficient enough with it to make head shots out to 30 yards or so. A .22 or shotgun would work as well, but as you stated your in a populated area and cant be shooting something loud after dark.
 

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buckseye said:
try getting a great pyrenese they are great at keeping coyotes away and will not harm any livestock if your property is fenced
Best answer so far!
I hear that Anatolian Sheperds are the fleas knees for coyote control. They are not only big, but very athletic, and tend to be easier to find a REAL breeder of WORKING dogs. They will not only drive a coyote off, but they will likely also kill it if they get their mouth on him.
Buying from a working kennel, be it Great Pyranese, Anatolian, or ??? is more important than the breed itself.
 

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buckseye wrote:
Quote:
try getting a great pyrenese they are great at keeping coyotes away and will not harm any livestock if your property is fenced

Best answer so far!

I hear that Anatolian Sheperds are the fleas knees for coyote control. They are not only big, but very athletic, and tend to be easier to find a REAL breeder of WORKING dogs. They will not only drive a coyote off, but they will likely also kill it if they get their mouth on him.
Buying from a working kennel, be it Great Pyranese, Anatolian, or ??? is more important than the breed itself.
Tied for first place in best answers, reminding you this is just my opinion.
I would sure like to see the battle, 150-200 lb dog against a 30 lb coyote ..haha that would be a sight to behold!! :)
 

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I agree with barebackjack. Those coyotes are far more interested in yor dog than in you. Coyotes are not known to attack humans. Animals, maybe yes, but not people. They might come across as being very threatening and menacing, but I don't believe that they will come after you unless something is wrong with them (sick, etc.) Maybe getting another dog of a different breed would be a good idea. Otherwise I also agree that the DNR would be interested in helping you with your situation.
 

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I wouldn't be too worried about coyotes attacking you. Wild animals generally are not too excited to deal with humans. How about coydogs? Anyone know if they are different?
 

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Those coyotes are far more interested in yor dog than in you
Dang easy to say until you are standing in the dark surrounded by coyotes!
 
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