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I think I've read every posting on the internet discussing comparisons of these two rounds (7mm Mag vs. 30.06). I'll likely purchase a REM 700 SPS Buckmaster in one of these two calibers; just can't decide. One thing I haven't really heard discussed on these two rounds is which would someone pick if money and convienience of finding rounds wasn't an issue. Purely on performance and capability which would you choose? I'm somewhat new to hunting but I hope to be hunting deer, elk, and bear all around the country but mostly in the Pacific NW. I haven't fully ruled the .270 out either.

Any opinions would be appreciated.
 

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Purely on performance, the 7MM Magnum wins. Ammo availability, probably favors the 06' (although I don't know why this should be a consideration as if you travel somewhere, forget your ammo, and you can't find the make & weight of ammo you are sighted in with, you are screwed either way. The answer is simply to buy or load to have a sufficient number of whatever load you settle on, and don't forget it...).

I have both 270 & 7MM Magnum. I've had quite a number of 06's over the years but always seem to trade them off. I've pretty much settled on the 308 for my non-magnum 30 caliber.

I like the 270 better than the 06' for no valid reason. I probably have killed bettter than 90% of all my big game with a 270. I also love the 7MM Magnum and consider it the point where power and shootability meet for the average shooter. If I could only have one rifle for all North American big game (excluding Brown Bear which I'll never hunt), I would go with the 7 MM Magnum...

The load I have developed for my 7MM is specifically for longer shots on deer/goats and, using a 120 grain Ballistic Tip, pretty much mirrors the performance of the 257 Weatherby. A couple years back when I went elk hunting, I took the 7MM along as breakdown backup to my 338 Magnum. The load I worked up specifically for this task used a 160 grain Accubond and tickled the envelope of the mighty 338. That's the versatility the 7MM brings to the table...

The 06' is versatile due to a wide variety of bullets & loads, but when it comes to longer range shooting or big stuff like elk, it just can't carry the mail in the same fashion. Conversely, it doesn't have as much recoil, burns less powder (more shells per pound of powder if you load) and by & large, factory ammo is a bit less costly...

Either way you go, you won't go wrong...
 

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I had the same prob once til I read a artical where the author made this statement ( when shooting large game I've run my three shot 7 mag dry but never run my 5 shot 06 empty ) I 'm a fan of bullet weight and diameter , with bullet weight availablity up to 220 grains the 06 wins there.
 

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I'll take some heat for this one but for whatever reason the 06 just never appealed to me.I know it's a great cartridge but thats the way it is.I'd rather have a 270,280 or the 7 mag.Same goes for 3-9 scopes.Everybody loves them but I'll never buy one.Go fig'er?
 

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Owned 2 7mm Rem Mags, but 30-06 & 308's are still here. Now I hunt close wooded areas not fields, even with that said a long shot around me averages under 350 yards. So the need was never there for me.

Why I got an 7STW I don't know.
 

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The .30'06 has been around for over 100 years for good reason. You really are not under gunned for anything except the big bears and then I would prefer the .338 Winchester Magnum over the 7mm Mag.

If you like 7mm take a look at the .280 Remington, it is basically a .30'06 necked down to 7mm. It will do about everything the 7mm Mag will do and be a lot less punishing to the shooter.
 

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As has been said on here already, you WILL NOT go wrong with either. I personally favor the 7mm Mag, just because where I hunt (Colorado and Wyoming) 300+ yard shots are very possible, and the 7 Mag shoots a couple inches flatter. I like that because it adds to the distance that you can hold on and not worry about holding over.
 

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In Craig Boddington's book Rifles of North America (I think that's the title I barrowed the book out a few years ago). It seems to me that the 7mm was developed by a elk outfitter who wanted a cartridge that that would deliver 30/06 energy levels further then the 30/06 was able to deliver, while not increasing the recoil levels. So the 7mmRemy was developed and became a commercial success. But for what ever reason Boddington didn't care for the 7mm all that much, (I think his reason was he was able to acquire a beautiful David Miller rifle that happened to be a 7mm mag) he killed a lot of animals with it so I guess it works. Dave Petzal of Field and Stream doesn't care for the 7mm that much either he sez it burns too much powder and the recoil levels are to high for the very slight gain in flatten trajectory.

Now people who shoot and like their 7mm Remington's are some of the most loyal and passionate about their caliber gun owners I have ever come across. So I think that sez something too.

I like the 30/06 and I have only shot a 7mm once though. I like my 7mm-08 witch is a bit slower then 7mm Remington. If I were to buy a 7mm mag of any kind I would opt for 7mm ultra or weatherby mag.
 

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this is just my opinon you dont need a 7mm ultra or weatherby the 7mm remmy will be just fine and the factory ammo is alot cheaper what you gain in energy and velocity is minmal compared to the ammo price just my . 02
 

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Two things to consider. One are you reloading or planning on shooting factory ammo? If it is factory ammo then the 06 is the way to go. It is loaded in a variety of bullet weights, and types by every Mfg on the market. I had the misfortune a number of years back of having my hunting ammo box stolen on an out of state hunt.

Before I left though I had also done some target shooting with factory ammo in a similar weight and design bullet. I knew the POI difference in that from the hand loads. First place I stopped they had the shells I desired in stock.

My hunting partner was shooting a 7MM Mag and drove for better than a half a day finding any ammo. Today it might be a bit different, but retail outlets are limited on space and as such the most common calibers are going to be carried.

Now ballistic wise the 7mm will perform better on smaller weight bullets than the 06 but not so in the heavier weight bullets. Thus what you will use it on, range of shots you plan on taking are all factors that should be considered.

Both are good choices, I am and will continue to shoot my 06 as my first choice. Have a 300 Win Mag in the cabinet as well as a .270 and sold my 7mm Mag because I did not like the rifle nor the fit and feel. Not so much the caliber or performance.

My next deer rifle will be a 7mm08 which is what my daughter is shooting and I like the killing power and recoil of this caliber very much. So have fun, enjoy whatever you buy and shoot it often to become proficient at the ranges you plan to shoot.

Watched a guy shoot at a deer this past Sat at better than 400 yards. He has enough rifle, and the gun itself is accurate at that range, but the person shooting the gun would have had issues hitting a pickup at 200 yards anywhere!!!!!!!!!
 

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Yea I agree with you too you don't need a weatherby or ultra mag. I was just thinking if I had to but up with the extra recoil for a slight insignificant gain in velocity I might as well go all out with a bit more recoil for a much bigger gain in velocity with the ultra or weaterby.

A lot of the popularity of the 7mm Remington had to do with Warren Page and his 7mm Mashburn. The Mashburn would push a 175 grain bullet at 3000 fps the 7mm remmy won't.

Another good point you bring up is price, I think the last time a saw the price for weatherby ammo it was something like $60 + for a box, that's too much. I like 30/06 federal blue box ammo for $14 at Scheels much better.
 

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I've been following this thread, and I thought Ron was going to mention my take on this comparison, but he stopped a little short. It concerns handloaded ammo vs factory.

How many have shot factory ammo over a chronograph? You will immediately see that all the info you read in ballistic charts and ammo box lids is just that......info. Info that is not pertinent to you because your gun is probably shooting that ammo about 200 fps slower than what is claimed. 7mm Mag ammo that I have chrono'd was grossly underpowered, and I would expect to see the same results from most factory 06 ammo due to the simple fact the manufacturer could be held liable if that ammo was fired in a rifle that was over 100 years old, so load maximums are based on that possibility.

If you handload, I see the 06 as having a clear advantage. Obviously more bullet choices, and I really don't see a big trajectory advantage for the magnum...as far as hunting conditions go, when you consider what each cartridge is capable of with good loads.

Back when I was loading a 7 mag my best load was with a 160 gr Partition at 3015fps. My best load with my 06 is a 165 gr Partition at just a fuzz under 3000fps. But one does it with about 58 grains of powder in a 22" barrel and the other did it with 80 grains of powder and 24" of barrel. Now if you can find a way to get 3100fps with a 160 in a 7mm Mag like some books say you can you may start to think the trajectory difference is worth consideration, but I was never able to find a way to get that bullet going that fast.

They're both great, but you can NOT go wrong with the '06 :wink:

:beer:
 

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I used to shoot a 3006 Browning auto that I got rid of due to accuracy problems that developed with that particular gun. At the time, the only "backup" rifle I had was a model 700 7mm I had from my days living in WY. I have used that rifle ever since, mostly for whitetails. I see no advantage of the 7mm over the 3006 unless you are shooting over 300 yards--its a little flatter. The disadvantage with the 7mm is that I find the muzzle blast to be so punishing that I have taken to wearing sonic ear valves while hunting. I also find the 7mm to be more destructive to the meat of the animal. If I had my druthers, I would change the caliber of my rifle to 3006, but I just keep shooting it because this particular gun is accurate, never loses its zero, and has been absolutely reliable. Plus I am a cheapskate and don't want to spring for a new gun just to change calibers.
 
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