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I have been contemplating a snow goose hunt into your state. I grew up in South Dakota, now live in Minnesota and am looking to do some snow goose hunting. I have hunted canadian's but really would like to try chasin the the white fronts. Can anyone help steer me in the right direction of places to go ect. I have no snow goose decoys. Any help would be appreciated.

the goslin
 

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White fronts? Not Many of them in ND. But as for snows, we saw quite a few about 45 miles east of rugby. Further east would be even better probably. Im not all that much of a snow chaser, but we did see quite a few last fall. You were talking about the fall season right?
 

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Your best bet is to time them right. Try to keep an open schedule around the first week of November (give or take a couple weeks).

You'll get frustrated in a hurry if you get here too early, they get real spooky.

Usually the later the better.
 

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If you do chose to go to ND be very flexible in the game you chose to pursue. Snows, Canada geese, ducks, or upland. Weather and migration patterns vary each year. Picking the right week for a NR to visit is tricky at best so be flexible. Chase what you see.

25 years ago or more Salyer refuge held 50,000+ whitefronts each fall. In the '80s and '90s the the snows moved in. 100,000 to 400,000 birds on this refuge was very common in October. Now this refuge is nearly dead as a migratory goose stop over refuge.

Now days whitefronts can usually be found within 30 miles of the Missouri River as it flows through ND. Really hit or miss for specks in ND and only accounts for about 1% of the geese shot. They will stop over on a lake for a few days and then move on. Western Sask along the river (ie. Swift Current, SK). Lots and lots of Ross geese there too. Drought has dried up most of the lakes in this area so the geese will really use the river. This will concentrate the birds and hunters too.

Snows: go to eastern Sask or SW Manitoba. Even 50 - 100 miles north of the ND border will get you into big flocks of birds by mid October. These birds sit on the same rivers that they used to sit on in ND. Over the past 10 - 15 years, the Canadians built reservoirs on the same rivers - which have in turn short stopped geese by 100 miles or so.
 

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Thats why I'm going to Canada for the 1st time in 30 years. I have to see the reasons behind this.

My son was a good Hockey player when young - But hunting was his 1st love & they do not mix well (especially if you scout & go where the birds are.) Or take trips for Sharptails or Pheasants. - Not only the expense of both but the time available for both makes it impossible. I think Hunting is more of a life time sport that can be enjoyed forever. ( maybe not as a freelancer ??? :roll: ) Plus all the other activities youth want to do. It's no wonder not many hunt anymore.
 

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Not just hockey.

There are a lot of Class B football games played on Saturday afternoons in North Dakota. These young kids miss quite a few hunting opps in the process.

Practice every afternoon and games on Saturday. That leaves Sunday. If mom makes you go to church - how can you ever, ever learn to hunt. Especially ducks and geese in the morning.

When I was growing up in ND. High school football was Friday night. Weekends off. College football was on Saturday.
 

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Hockey and football....try 4th grade through 9th grade traveling basketball. Hard to teach kids about hunting when you're in Minneapolis on the weekends at a BB tournament In Sept or Oct.
 
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