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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, just wondering what you guys thought about the Jamestown Area. I am from Michigan and have hunted South Dakota twice, and North Dakota for the third time this year. We have hunted Rugby and last year McClusky. This year we are going to Jamestown due to lack of lodging in McClusky. Just wondered if anyone had any pros or cons about this move, anything that might be differant about this area, or anything else i should know. Any ideas or areas to go and stay away from would be appreciated.
 

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I would suggest looking north as the warea south and west of the Buffalo City is very very very dry and getting worse. Add into that eh number of nonresidents that have been using this area over the past years and the pressure will have pushed what birds are there into SD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ron , i have heard that North of Jamestown is loaded with guides. What do u think about west to Gackle, Napolean, Streeter? Give me an example of what type of wetland will be dry, last year in McClusky we had to hunt large bodies of water due to the rest being frozen. Also how long will it take to get to these areas. If we are there during the week will we run into many hunters, we are there oct 18-25. Sorry about all of the questions, just want to maximize my expirience.
 

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West towards Gackle you will run into one of the largest G/O in the state. 150,000 acres and rising. Basicly what you will find south of Jamestown will be what you had up at Mclusky after it froze, only difference will be dust instead of ice. Couple that with the fact that the Edgeley, Kulm,Gackle Ferdonia, Lehr, Ashley area's where pounded about as hard as any area in the state last fall, and with no limits on license this year, alot of those guys are going to find that the water they have hunted for the 5 years or less will be gone. most of the public lands will have numerous boats on them along with many or the private sloughs. This will just push the birds south. I saw it happen the last 2 years with average or above water conditions it will be worse this year.

Unless you are geared to field hunt and are willing to put on lots of miles your best bet is still north. It may mean a 75 mile drive to where you hunt, but you more than likely will not find much south that is not hunted or posted.

No significant rain south of i-94 since the end of June. High winds coupled with dry heat for 4 of the last six weeks and the water is just plain gone. Birds are concentrated and will not have any undistubed resting area's coupled with high hunting pressure. It is your choice but I am looking to the north and I was born and raised down in that counrty and have hunted it for 30 plus years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ron, thanks again for the info. By north are you refering to the Woodworth area? Is the water situation better north? Traveling is not to much of a problem so that is probably what we will end up doing. Are you saying that there is not many people that feild hunt, because we are prepared to feild hunt, in my opinion. Do you field hunt the area? What do you consider a good feild spread? Again sorry for all of the questions.
 

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I see few hunters that are from out of state that field hunt. Most are water hunters and many are boat hunters. i do hunt both water and field and like to hunt the smaller wetlands that are between the feeding area and the roosting area.

The problem is that field hunting in that area has become a real risk of a bust I have put birds to bed litterally watching the water until it is dark, then set up in the field the next morning only to have the roost blasted a legal shooting time. This changes the birds patterns few will go to the feild to feed. If you can find a roosting area that is posted unhunted field hunting will be productive.

As far as field layouts I like to use a combination of Canada decoys set up in family groups with pockets of ducks on the outer edge of the groups. This has been a good layout for me but others here have a lot more experience in field hunting than I.

To answer your question about how far north, I would concider going towards the Carringitn area and working east and west of 281. The farther of the pavement you get the less pressure you will find. If it is not dusty or muddy i am not scouting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ron, that last sentance is a very good quote. About the dust and mud.. Where I live in Northern Michigan we are very aware of the places we have to go and how hard we need to work for ducks. Having hunted North Dakota three other times it is very obvious that people go 10 feet off the highway, it is like that deer hunting here, but the people who go the extra 30 miles away from the nearest town are the ones who get the ducks. We also have 300- 400 snow goose decoys, would this be worth putting out with the canadas and mallards? I have 6 full bodies canadas, 60-70 outlaw silouhetts, 2-3 dozen mag shells, i dozen outlaw mallards, i dozen full body mallards and the snow goose decoys.
 
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