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I have read and followed the NR controversy closely and and feel that it is vital that freelance hunting be preserved. Now it seems a move is underway to require nrs visiting Manitoba and presumabley Sk Ab as well to hire a guide/outfitter to hunt waterfowl. I know that there are quite a few of you guys who travel north to hunt and I believe you are mostly competant to to set decoys, call etc without a guide. Once again the GREED and COMMERCIALIZATION of this great sport rears its ugly head. i AM HERE TO TELL YOU THAT THIS WILL ULTIMATLEY KILL THE SPORT WE ALL LOVE. If any of you hunt Manitoba , Saskatchewan Etc. I implore you to make your calls write letters do what you can to nix this nonsense.This guide / outfitter crap has got to be controlled anybody with a dozen shell decoys that happens to be aresident is now a guide. Remember these are migratory birds no one owns them. Also What about all our DU and Delta money that we have contributed that is spent in Canada.Lets fight together to kill this now. Long live the average Joe and freelance hunting.
 

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Scissorbill--I heard about this--It is basically the outfitters that are trying to RAM this through--and unfortunately there are not many local Canadians that hunt to fight this--when they finally succeed in driving us do-it-yourselfers off there won't be anyone left to fight for Sportsmans rights--WE ARE THE BACKBONE OF THIS SPORT--Picture this --you can't hunt in North Dakota unless you go through an outfitter--I wonder if anybody would get there undies in a twist?--you watch--the next step will be for the Canadian Government to put a large tax on hunting with a Guide--then watch them cry for us to help them fight it--then it will be to late--us small guys will be long gone and won't really care anymore--kind of a sad state of affairs :cry: ---GOOD HEADS UP SCISSORBILL
 

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This whole thing started within the last few years when it was found that some of the American slobs were dumping ducks and geese so they could keep on pounding them. The opportunist guides jumped in with both feet as if they would be the heros and stop this wanton waste of birds. They would stop those ugly Americans from shooting too many birds and dumping them.

I hope a few of the slobs don't wreak it for all of us freelancers.
 

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Perry,

That's exactly what I've been told. We had a federal warden in our spread telling us the horror stories of the Americans blatently breaking all the laws (Decoyer and Field Hunter can confirm this). The warden claimed at the time that it was a lot further down the chain than most think....but again it's hearsay.

When I hear about this I have no words to describe how disgusted it makes me feel. :******:
 

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Also, realize that there is a precedent for this already - you can't hunt big game, wolf or coyote in Alberta (unsure of other provinces) without a guide or "hunter host".

They even have bizarre restrictions on hunter hosts, so many hoops to jump through at different times that it makes guides the easiest option. However, it was probably the only way they could get something like this to survive the political process.

Morover, I have to go through all this stuff if I want to go home and hunt deer on the land to which I, and I alone, hold the title. Pretty bizarre.

M.

Non-resident (Canadian) and Non-resident Alien hunters of big game, wolf and coyote must be accompanied by a licensed guide or a Hunter Host. Each of these hunters has two options:

1. he or she may contract the holder of a valid Big Game Outfitter-guide Permit, be guided by a Big Game Designated Guide, and hunt under the authority of a licence allocated to an outfitter-guide (for information on outfitter-guides, contact the Alberta Professional Outfitters Society at http://www.apos.ab.ca), OR
2. he or she may be hosted by a Hunter Host (see below) - usually a relative or friend - and hunt according to the following restrictions and conditions:
* Non-resident Aliens may hunt with a Hunter Host only if they have not done so in the previous two (2) fiscal years (April 1 - March 31).
* Non-residents (Canadian) and Non-resident Aliens are limited to certain licences as indicated in the Licence Availability section under Licensing and Costs.
* Non-resident Aliens hosted by Hunter Hosts may hunt big game only during seasons that do not require one of the special licences, obtained through a draw, indicated by a in the Big Games Seasons (WMUs) section or listed under Additional Special Licence Draw Hunts.
* A Non-resident Alien and his or her intended Hunter Host must apply at a Fish and Wildlife Division office for their licences and make a statutory declaration that he or she understands the terms and conditions of the licences (Scroll down to view Hunter Host Licence).
* A Non-resident Alien must not hunt bighorn sheep, cougar or trophy antelope while accompanied by a Hunter Host.
* Further Restrictions for Non-resident Aliens Who are Not Relatives of the Hunter Host or the Hunter Host's Spouse
* Relatives are defined as father, brother, son, uncle, nephew, grandfather, grandson, son-in-law, brother-in-law (and female equivalents) of the Hunter Host or spouse of the Hunter Host.
* The Non-resident Alien and intended Hunter Host, if not related, must initiate an application at a Fish and Wildlife Division office for their licences, described above, by August 29 of the licence year, or by the following February 27 for the spring black bear hunt.
* The Non-resident Alien may apply to hunt only two (2) species of big game.

A Hunter Host

* Must be an adult resident.
* Must be the holder of a valid Hunter Host Licence (below).
* may not provide services for gain or reward, or accept remuneration, directly or indirectly, for such services.
* may host a maximum of two (2) hunters/year, either Non-residents (Canadian), Non-resident Aliens or a combination thereof. If hosting 2 Non-resident Aliens, at least 1 must be a relative.
* may host Non-resident Aliens only if the host has not hosted a Non-resident Alien in the previous two (2) fiscal years (April 1 to March 31).
* must report to the Fish and Wildlife Divison by December 31 in the year of harvest, all animals killed by the Non-resident Aliens he or she hosted.
* must accompany the hunter(s) named on his or her Hunter Host Licence while they are hunting big game under the authority of the Hunter Host Licence.

Hunter Host Licence
A resident who wishes to be a Hunter Host may purchase a Hunter Host Licence at any private licence issuer. You must have the WIN(s) of the non-resident(s) at the time of purchase. You must ensure that the hunters you host are named on your Hunter Host Licence. If you purchase your Hunter Host licence naming one hunter and you decide to add a second hunter to your licence at a later date, you can do so at no additional charge. Return to a private licence issuer with your licence and have it amended. Once you have purchased your Hunter Host Licence, the hunters may purchase their licences.

A Hunter Host who plans to take a non-resident alien hunting must do the following:

1. Go to a Fish and Wildlife Division office and initiate an application (including statutory declaration). Sign it and have your signature sworn. If your Non-resident Alien is not a relative, you must start this process by August 29 or February 27 as described above.
2. Have the Non-resident Alien sign the application and have his or her signature sworn. (If the Non-resident Alien does not have a WIN, have him or her fill out a WIN application at the same time.)
3. Take the completed application to a Fish and Wildlife Division office. The application will be reviewed for final approval and keyed into the automated licensing system.
4. When you are notified that your application is approved, go to any private licence issuer and purchase your Hunter Host Licence (see above) and the appropriate Wildlife Certificate and licences.
 

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I contacted the Saskatchewan government about the non-resident issue last December. The fellow i talked to was one of the top officials in the department of the environment for the province. He told me that non-residents needing a guide to hunt waterfowl will neaver happen. It was something that the outfitters association was trying to push through. What will probably happen in the near future, is a season limit on ducks and whitefronts, similar to what is in place now for upland birds. The season limit would not be applied to snows and canadas.
Yes, i am one of the resident Saskatchewan hunters that gives a damn about the future of hunting in this province.
 

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nickel ditch, great to visit with a Canadian neighbor. Question: How did you fellows come up with the law on season limits? I mean how did the process work? Did the sportsmen bring it forward, or your DNR? I assume there is a Canadian Wildlife Federation.......did they play a part? Are the Canadian sportsmen organized in one group or fragmented into many? Got any hot tips for us here as far as protecting our resource. From MRN's posts it sounds like you folks are way ahead of the curve compared to us in ND.
 

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Ok help me out other than the obvious what does SOB stand for?
 

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The migratory game bird limit is set by the federal government. The upland bird limit is set by the provincal government. The saskatchewan wildlife federation is the most active organisation in the province. If any group has influence in provincial limits, it's them. I think every province has a group similar to them.
The provincal government has recognised the ever increasing amount of non-resident hunters and i think you'll see the season limit on ducks and whitefronts happen soon.
But the hunting up here is changing. We're not at the numbers you guys are, but it's getting busier every year. I first started reading this forum, because of what you guys are going through. Figured maybe we could learn from your experience. I think the biggest difference up here is that people can't charge you for access to their land. Because no matter how much money you have, somebody has always got more.

Fetch
All i've seen up here for snows is flock of about 300 which has been here for a week or two. Seeing some canadas migrate in though. But it's really, really dry up here.
 

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nd, so, ah, would Canada take us? Please?

"I first started reading this forum, because of what you guys are going through. Figured maybe we could learn from your experience. I think the biggest difference up here is that people can't charge you for access to their land. Because no matter how much money you have, somebody has always got more."------- nickel ditch

By forsight or extrodinary coincidence in 2001 the voters of North Dakota passed Concurrent Reslution #3018=Constitutional Measure 1, "Hunting, trapping, and fishing are a valued part of our heritage and will be forever preserved for the people and managed by law and regulation for the public good". 200,000 YES-60,000 NO
 
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