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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just bought some bigfoots to go with my higdons. i noticed that the higdons were suprisingly darker than the foots. will this have any effect on decoying the geese. i know mixing shells and FBs dont matter. any thoguhts or suggestions would be great. thanks
 

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I bought some higdons since they were cheaper then some biggoots. I have been mixing them around a ratio of 3 to 1 for a couple years and I have had no problems. The geese don't notice a difference at all you should be fine
 

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People put way too much thinking into goose hunting. just go out and have fun and quit worrying what people are going to think about your decoys. somewhere along the line goose hunting has become a competitive sport and not for fun anymore
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
trust me its still fun. and i could really care less what people think of my spread. i just wanted to know if shy geese would spook from the different colors. even if people said it would have been a problem i still would use them. i simply wanted to know if anyone has had a problem with that.
 

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People put too much emphasis on the "perfect" coloration when it comes to hunting. Coloration in game and their environment varies widely and while something that is a bit off may result in a bit more scutiny by game as long as there aren't any accompanying factors that alert the game it usually isn't a problem. I've always contended that you have to alert at least 2 of your games senses before it will cause alarm that will trigger flight.

I chuckle when I hear guys decoying in the fields talk about hiding this and that and making sure everthing is perfect. I've been up in a plane during hunting season and believe me, there isn't a field out there that is perfect. Rocks, furrows, weeds and etc. all give fields a patchwork look. Even nature provides "odd" and "reflective" surfaces in just about any environment. The key is to make sure there there are not too many of these things that overlap in your spread. I have not been up in years so I have not seen a well camoflaged layout blind from the air but I can assure you that from the air it is much more visible than anyone thinks it is I don't care how well it is hidden. Even the best hidden layout can't help disturb furrow lines, the natural flow of grass or other natural "lines" that can be observed from above.
 

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Great point ds2. The view from above really allows you to pick out major differences when they seem miniscule from the spread.
 
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