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I want to start educating my two sons about using, respecting and having fun with shooting. I've been involved with gun clubs since a very young boy. I figure what better way to begin having fun and teaching them than with a .22 caliber rifle.

At this point in their education I don't want to go out and spend hundreds of dollars on a gun. So my obvious question is to have some experienced suggestions on types and brand rifles to look at and ones not to waste my time on. I've chosen .22 for the obvious reason that ammo is cheap and it won't scare the hell out of them the first time out of the gate. First impressions.

They are 4 and 6 years old. I believe in educating kids about firearms early so they can begin to understand and respect something that they can have a lifetime of safe fun with.

Thanks

friej
 

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friej said:
I want to start educating my two sons about using, respecting and having fun with shooting. I've been involved with gun clubs since a very young boy. I figure what better way to begin having fun and teaching them than with a .22 caliber rifle.

At this point in their education I don't want to go out and spend hundreds of dollars on a gun. So my obvious question is to have some experienced suggestions on types and brand rifles to look at and ones not to waste my time on. I've chosen .22 for the obvious reason that ammo is cheap and it won't scare the hell out of them the first time out of the gate. First impressions.

They are 4 and 6 years old. I believe in educating kids about firearms early so they can begin to understand and respect something that they can have a lifetime of safe fun with.

Thanks

friej
I think you can get a "Chipmunk" .22 for like $100 or something. Really cheap. There great singleshot bolt actions. I grew up on one. Go look at Gander, Sportsman or Cabelas.

.
 

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We got my younger cousin a cricket a few years back for like 100, and they are very well made.
 

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I think for kids to learn on safety must be the top priority.As such a single shot would be best though a bolt with a clip mag would be almost as good to.I wouldn't even consider a semi-auto for the same reason.I'd also stay away from something with a tube mag.It's very rare but they have been known to have a round stick in the tube working free later on.
 

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Henry Repearing Arms makes two very good entry level rifles for beginning shooters. Both bolt actions. One is a smaller scaled version for children, the other a full size version. Both are very affordable. Good on you for educating your children on firearms safety!
Burl
 

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I guess I look at this differently, because I WOULD recommend a semi-auto. A 10/22, to be exact. They are practically bullet proof ( :wink: ), more accurate than they get credit for with decent ammo, cheap, stocks are almost a dime a dozen so you can cut one down to fit, and he will never out grow it. I love all mine!

My son learned with one, and they can be used as a single shot if you wish. You're the one doing the loading anyway. :wink:

Good luck!
 

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Csquared said:
I guess I look at this differently, because I WOULD recommend a semi-auto. A 10/22, to be exact. They are practically bullet proof ( :wink: ), more accurate than they get credit for with decent ammo, cheap, stocks are almost a dime a dozen so you can cut one down to fit, and he will never out grow it. I love all mine!

My son learned with one, and they can be used as a single shot if you wish. You're the one doing the loading anyway. :wink:

Good luck!
If you want to use a 10/22 as a single shot without a mag it's hard to load.

When I was little I learned the importance of shot placement because I only had 1 bullet and I knew I had to make that first shot count.

As soon as I got my first semi-auto my shooting went to crap. It took me awhile to learn to make that first shot count again.

I think a lot of people have the same problem when they first switch from single shot to auto guns.

.
 

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Csquared said:
I guess I look at this differently, because I WOULD recommend a semi-auto. A 10/22, to be exact. They are practically bullet proof ( :wink: ), more accurate than they get credit for with decent ammo, cheap, stocks are almost a dime a dozen so you can cut one down to fit, and he will never out grow it. I love all mine!

My son learned with one, and they can be used as a single shot if you wish. You're the one doing the loading anyway. :wink:

Good luck!
The Ruger 10-22 was my first rifle and in fact still my only .22 but as much as I like it and recommend them again I still think safety is most important in this instance.
 

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I understand you guys' point, and I don't mean to take issue with it, as I actually believe it has validity in many cases...like when some I know let the kids take off on their own with "their gun", and very little supervision. I didn't take that route. I was with my son ALL the time when he was learning, and I don't just mean for the first year or so, so I never felt like there was a safety concern. As far as marksmanship, I pride myself on my shooting ability, and I think he could out shoot me on squirrels by the time he was 13.

And Bernie.....how many people and/or farm animals did you shoot while you were learning with your 10/22? :lol:

Sorry...I couldn't resist! :wink:

Like I said, I agree with you guys...for the most part. But you want to be sure he has equipment that's good enough to challenge AND reward him. At 4 and 6 anything will fit that category, but you could end up with a gun that has no use rather quickly.

Thanks for lettin me have some fun with this! :beer:
 

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No offense taken.That said I bought it new about 30 years ago.I was around 22 back then so I was my own adult supervision.I had learned safe gun handling while at summer camp back in my Boy Scout days years earlier.All they had were cheap single shot Winchester bolts.A couple had hair triggers.If you fired before the range boss said it was ok you had to leave the range.That occurred a few times during the two weeks we were there.Not just kids but Scout Masters as well.
 

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You got me beat by just a few years, Bernie. Think back to how times have changed. Back then most guys I knew didn't have much gun training, and gun wasn't even a bad word back then ! :wink:

Thanks for getting my humor ! :beer:

Dan
 

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I'm new here, and this is my first post, and I'm going to jump in on the side of the 10/22 also, assuiming the kids are big enough to hold it. They do make it in a "youth" model also. As someone else said you can find stocks for them almost as cheap as firewood if/when you want to upsize it later on. With a Chipmunk or other rifle, when the kid outgrows it, it's use is pretty much over, until the grandkids come along.

A single shot is safer? Maybe so, but who said you have to fully load the magazine? Take the magazine out, load one, insert magazine, chamber that one, shoot, repeat as needed. What's the problem? You can teach "one shot" all day long.
 

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The Ruger 10-22 remains the best buy there is among .22 rifles. They are very reliable, reasonably priced, and your kids will never grow out of one. And you can buy spare mags or other parts/accessories almost anywhere. As mentioned earlier, you can easily use it as a single shot by loading one shell at a time into the magazine. Autos have a bad rap because many of the accidents that happen with autos involve handling by someone who is unfamiliar with the operation of an autoloader. Obviously, it would be your job to make sure they do become familiar with any firearm they are going to use.
 
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