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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this the last year of the study on the Hen Mallard, Pintail, Canvasback. Shoot one of the three and you can't shoot the other? Our group that comes each tries to only kill drakes but I don't care who you are with some of the lighting situations while hunting it is very tough to kill only drakes. That law makes it very tough, and has cut a lot of our hunts short. I'm not complaining because the hunt isn't always about the end result, just adds alittle stress to the situation.

Another thing on a side note I'm from Iowa and yesterday I received a survey from the US Fish and Wildlife service on hunting coot, rail, snipe and something called guillananes? in North Dakota. They asked that after I make the trip this year to fill out the survey and send it in which I intend to do. My question is does anyone other than the USFWS really care about hunting those species of birds? I have never set out with the intention of shooting any of them, how many people out there in ND do? Anyway just curious. I will be coming ot that great state on Oct. 5th this season can't hardly wait.
 

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Did your parents ever tell you the story of the birds and the bee's? Hen mallards are the one laying the eggs 8) If you're not positive on the bird ID, don't shoot, easy as that. With the low populations after the dry spring here I could care less if I had to ONLY shoot drakes. They're keeping the 1 hen in there for safety of flock shots.
 

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I tend to agree with Chaws. Last year we hunted a few times early in the year where we had 3 people with flocks of 30 to 40 birds coming in. We would take 1 shot, drop 1 drake and wait for the next flock because it was tough to identify birds. We just made sure we found big feeds or else it was tough to get into a lot of birds. Also, 1 of the hunters was my wife in her first real season hunting and she got into the action as well. It can be done. If you're not certain, don't shoot.
 

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where the h### have you been !! You haven't been hunting till you've been on a good coot and rail shoot ! And gallinules are 10 times better than sky-carp ! Have to lead 'em just right when they're lilly-hoppin' tho. One thing for sure - you're stress-free on this hunt because drake coots , rails and gallinules are cross-dressers and usf&w don't seem to get upset what gender you're cleaning. If you go -I've got a great coot/rail recipe involving a pine board - but you may already know it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So Chaws what your saying is you've never shot a hen or in low light conditions? Gotta throw up the BS flag on that one. I don't care who or how experienced or great of shot you are that doen't happen 100% of the time. All I was pointing out is that it makes it difficult and we have quit hunting early on many occasions as to not shoot the egg layers. So anyway is this the last year of the study?
 

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I've shot a hen in years past but never on purpose, always on accident and never an accident because I couldn't identify the birds coming in. Generally in our groups, a downed hen is usually because of another bird in the background of the main target getting caught in the crossfire. I have no idea on the study, but I would like to see the study continue.
 

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Chaws said:
...and never an accident because I couldn't identify the birds coming in...
Not calling you a liar, but I'll be the first one to admit that in the nearly 30 years that I've been playing this game, I've dropped a couple hens by accident. Call it the excitement of the moment, brain fart, shiz for brains or whatever else, it does happen. Especially with inexperience. Now yeah it's been years, but "never" is a very big word.

I find it much easier to pick drakes in field hunting, but still if the light is not good, like early or late in the day, it can be tough. But in field hunting you often have wave after wave coming, so you just don't shoot if you aren't 100% sure. Water hunting can be a bit tougher...at least for me.

I think the hunter's choice rule is good...nothing wrong with looking just a little bit harder before pulling the trigger.
 

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i agree withe the fact that if you shoot all the hens the duck population goes down. but i dont understand why we here in nd can shoot 1 hen and in canada you can shoot 8 (i may be wrong but thats how i read it) and in most of the rest of the country you can shoot at least 2. i know it is an experimenal thing but i dont know if im much of a fan of it.
 

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Niener you will never win. i agree with you Its very very hard in north dakota to id drakes and hens in the early season. I wish there was a buffer there atleast two hens would help alot better. Some people on this have to always be right and will never give in they are gods and just like to get after other people. And YES you know they have shot hens!!
 

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I am the first to admit I have shot hens in nasty weather it can be hard sometimes and have saw a darker head on real dark day and realized it was a hen once it was to late. I agree any one who hunts ducks have shot hens. everyone tries to shoot drakes yes but accidents happen I am from MIssouri we have the 2 hen limit but I can not remember the last time I shot 2 hens in one day. I think it should be one hen the only part I am confused about is what does shooting a pintail have to do with a mallard hen. I am really asking not being a smart a$$. Is this just another way to get people to stop shooting mallard hens.
 

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The last hen I shot was an accident. And if I had to replay it over, id shot her again, she looked JUST like a drake the way the sun was hitting her. Pretty sure ive only whacked one or two hens in the last 3-4 years though.

But as for the hunters choice law. So what if you have to cut a hunt short every now and than. If your doing it alot though than your shooting to many hens. Sounds like your to hung up on limits and shooting. If your in doubt, dont shoot, pretty simple. Deal with it or stay home.

As for one hen, one pintail, on can....obviously they don't want you shooting many hen mallards, and they don't want you shooting many pinnies and cans as their numbers are supposedly down.
 

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Chaws said:
I've shot a hen in years past but never on purpose, always on accident and never an accident because I couldn't identify the birds coming in. Generally in our groups, a downed hen is usually because of another bird in the background of the main target getting caught in the crossfire. I have no idea on the study, but I would like to see the study continue.
whatever. go hunt your way and everyone can hunt theirs......if everyone stays within the rules no one is wrong.

you are no better or worse than the guys that shot a hen to fill out their bag. If you think everyone goes out to shoot a bag of hens....gimme a break.
 

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mnbirdhunter said:
I shoot nothing but hens.. drakes taste funny
NICE, haha... I am pretty decent at bird ID and i will be 100% honest, I shoot a few hens a season, IT HAPPENS. for those who won't admit that they too are capable of mistakes, :******: stay on your pedistal(s) because it will be less likely for someone to confuse you for sportsmen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree with birdog105, all I was doing is asking and the lords of hunting appear. I am very against shooting hens but it does happen and I know a lot of guys that do it regularly because the law allows. All this I'm better than you BS gets ridiculous, right to the douche that says stay home if you can't ID them. I can ID them just fine under good lighting conditions and simply I'm stating the law cuts our hunting short under poor conditions. Should we not hunt in poor conditions? Maybe not but I do at home so if I drive 13 hours and have the legal right to I 'm going to here as well. Then the douches come out and say it all about limits and that bull, I love when these macho studs can hide behind a computer and put themselves on a pedestal. Masybe this year I'll shoot everything that flies by to save the effort of being politically/legally correct. :withstupid: :beer: :puke: :******: :eyeroll: :evil: :x :eek: :( :lol: :cry: :wink: :oops: 8) :) :D :-? :p :roll: :poke:
 

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my beef with this law is that there is no biological tie between hen mallards, pintails, and cans. Why not be able to shoot a hen mallard and a drake pintail. Cans are divers anyway, who eats those???
 

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barebackjack said:
The last hen I shot was an accident. And if I had to replay it over, id shot her again, she looked JUST like a drake the way the sun was hitting her....
Yep, me too. The last one I recall was that way, and I'd do it again too. Just an instant reaction, and I was sure on the wing. As I said, you play this game long enough and Chit happens.

Now that's not to say there is a time or two when I say to hell with it and pop a hen to fill the limt. Once or twice a year I'll do that...I admit it

HI...MY NAME'S DAN, AND I'M A DUCK AHOLIC. I EVEN OCCASIONALLY SHOOT A HEN. 8)
 

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Dude, get off your :soapbox: and read what you've typed. You've basically said that in low light, bad weather, or fast flying flocks it's tough to pick out the drakes/hens. Well if you're not sure what the ID is, don't pull the trigger. ND gives you the single hen buffer and if you take that shot, pick up and head home. Why allow a person who's willing to take 50% positive ID shots after they've already downed a hen?

Maybe it's because I live in ND and do my hunting here, but I can always come out the next day or the next weekend to shoot birds. I'm not pressing my luck when it comes to maintaining the integrity of a sportsman and shooting outside the limits or outside the species regulations. If you feel 100% sure that the bird is a drake, poke it. If you're not totally sure and you decide to take that shot, don't shoot at other birds in the folk until you are sure after picking the bird up. Easy as that.

Regarding the other portion of your question about the test period. Yes, I do believe that this is the last season and they review over next summer whether to continue the enforcement of the limits and types of birds you can shoot. After this lousy nesting season across much of ND and Canada, my vote would be to continue the current regulations.
 
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